Putting EMM Vendors Through Poodle Attack Check: All But One Pass Ring of Fire

Earlier this morning I was chatting with a CIO of a large manufacturing organization with presence across multiple continents. They are currently benchmarking Mobile Device Management (MDM) vendors to help secure their mobile environment and we are helping them with this activity. As part of our rigorous methodology, we put 5 key vendors – Mass360 (owned by IBM), MobileIron, Good, Microsoft InTune and AirWatch (owned by VMware) – through the Poodle Attack Vulnerability check and results were amusing. While all vendors passed this test, AirWatch couldn’t make it to the finish line and got an overall rating of F. See pictures below for more details. We had reported another similar test last week where we found Microsoft’s Office365 vulnerable to the Poodle Attack.

The Vendors Who Passed The Test

Maas360

MI

Microsoft InTune

Good

The Vendor Who Didn’t Make It – AirWatch (owned by VMware) Failed The Test With an Overall Rating of F.

VMware

Greyhound Standpoint

Greyhound Research believes it’s an absolute must for organizations to have such security checks as part of the overall methodology to benchmark the Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) players and other Cloud Service providers. The Poodle Attack is a critical vulnerability and IT Decision Makers must ensure all the shortlisted vendors pass this test.

What’s your Standpoint?
Are you currently evaluating/using Mobile Device Management as part of your broader Enterprise Mobility Management strategy and unsure about your current setup in light of these results? If you are a key IT decision maker in your organization and need guidance on devising a cloud security strategy best fit for your organization, leave a comment or send me an email on sgogia@greyhoundgroup.com.

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SVG 200x200About The Author: Sanchit Vir Gogia is the Chief Analyst & CEO of Greyhound Research, an independent IT & Telecom Research & Advisory firm. He also serves as Founder & CEO of Greyhound Knowledge Group that operates under four brands – Greyhound Research, Greyhound Sculpt, Greyhound Technocrat and Greyhound Vivo. To read more about him, click here.

Written by Sanchit Vir Gogia

Sanchit is the Chief Futurist, Founder & CEO of Greyhound Knowledge Group, a Global, Award-Winning, Digital Transformation Research & Advisory Group. He also serves as Chief Analyst & CEO of Greyhound Research, an Award-Winning, Global, Independent Technology Transformation Research & Advisory firm. Read more about Sanchit on http://bit.ly/svgworld.

One comment

  1. Reality it that Airwatch didn’t care about the Poodle vulnerability for a VERY long time and many of its servers remained vulnerable to this. The worst part of this fiasco is that they didn’t tell their existing customers that the Cloud that they were using was vulnerable. #epic #fail

    Liked by 1 person

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